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Adding parameter to all requests made by ArcGIS iOS SDK?

Adding parameter to all requests made by ArcGIS iOS SDK?


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I am developing an app that uses ArcGIS iOS SDK.

My requirement is that I want to pass a session token (Received from my backend along with Login response) to each and every service call the SDK makes. As we know the SDK exposed API & usually accepts URL as a parameter. If i supply the URL of the map service, it would fetch the map info like images, etc & loads it on my view. This token is used by my backend team to authorize the user & respond the relevant map information from GIS server.

I know about AGSCredential object that is used to access secure GIS servers. My requirement is not only connecting to a secured GIS server but also get data based on current user. My app has 5 kinds of users who access the same GIS but should not be able to access complete data. To achieve this the Backend team has introduced a proxy layer, where the iOS SDK should talk to it. The proxy layer responds with appropriate data based on token that the client sends along with every request. The SDK requests should have a header with the token.

I wanted to know if this possible and, if yes, how can I accomplish it?

The web developers who use the ARCGIS SDK for .Net managed it by writing a proxy between the SDK and service layer on client. They are suggesting me to also do a similar thing but I doubt if that is possible in iOS.

Perhaps someone came across a similar scenario where you need to proxy the service calls made by a library integrated in an iOS application. I am sure we can add a parameter or header if the service request is written by me, but I want to proxy the calls happening from my SDK (ArcGIS iOS).


I don't think that the current ArcGIS Runtime for iOS SDK is designed for consuming proxy directly. But there is one method you can connect to add extra info by using AGSREquest setAdditionalUserAgentInfo: , as you can see this method only take NSString.

Therefore, you need to create a NSURLProtocal class by using pure iOS SDK to make it able to change the headers. add a proxy to NSURLRequest.


Adding parameter to all requests made by ArcGIS iOS SDK? - Geographic Information Systems

In summary, the research and analysis that we have done for this project has enabled us to learn more about GIS, the utilization of the GIS approach in this project is also essential in identifying the nearby amenities of each area.

This challenge has enabled us to learn more about Census, why it is important for a country to practice census, and how we can make good use of the census data for citizens.

Though this period, we had a better understanding of how census analysis, coupled with business marketing analysis, inter-relates to each other to further strengthen the spatial analysis, providing more refined set of analysis that are useful for several scenarios. From the leisure users who view this data for fun to the serious users who uses it to correlates with their business plans and analysis. We have also understood that most decision makers do rely on census analysis to build on and improve policies, amenities etc.

This challenge has also motivated us to learn on new skillets, which is development on iPhone platform, as well as leveraging on the OneMap. This has been a difficult process for us, learning from ground up, starting with a new project till the completed app. We are glad that besides gaining a deeper knowledge on spatial analysis, we have also acquired new skillsets.

Our mobile application gives users a feel of how census data can be effectively used and presented, the usefulness of the business and marketing analysis tool, which collectively introduces and showcases the concept of Census Analytics.


by ScottBall

These are exciting times for Explorer for ArcGIS!

We recently announced that Explorer has arrived on Windows 10. In addition, we just delivered new releases for Explorer on iOS and Android which bring powerful new offline capabilities and an improved experience to the app across all supported platforms.

Explorer is the best mobile application for viewing your maps wherever you are, with or without a data connection. You can see your maps, search for and be directed to places and features, get information about your assets, and add and share your own notes and markup – all from the palm of your hand!

If you already know and love Explorer, you’re about to love it even more! With our latest releases, Explorer offers the best of our current mapping capabilities.

The new features include the ability to:

  • Work with web maps offline
  • Maintain situational awareness in the field
  • View Tracker for ArcGIS tracks (iOS only)
  • Manage complex workflows with easier app linking
  • Sideload your basemaps
  • ….and much more!

Work with web maps offline

Mobile workers need to be able to view their maps and find features or places even when they are in locations with limited or no connectivity. This latest release of the Explorer app brings greater flexibility for working offline so your mobile workforce can keep going even in places without a data connection.

In addition to using mobile map packages to work offline, now you can also use web maps to define offline areas for use in Explorer. There are two ways you can do this with web maps:

Pre-define offline areas. Map creators can set up offline areas in a web map through ArcGIS Online (or Enterprise) and make them available for mobile workers to download and use in Explorer.

In ArcGIS Online, you can use the brand new scheduled updates feature to help you keep your offline map areas current. This pushes out any changes you’ve made and makes them available for your users to download at a specific date and time that you set. These updates contain only the data that has changed since the package was last created or refreshed which provides a streamlined downloading experience.

Create offline areas on demand. Mobile workers can download a web map that has been configured for offline use and create their own offline areas in the Explorer app.

Maintain situational awareness in the field

The ability to monitor your operations in near-real time is essential for making informed decisions and responding quickly to incidents as they happen. This is especially crucial in highly dynamic situations like public event or disaster response operations.

Watch your maps come alive in Explorer by defining refresh intervals for your web maps in ArcGIS Online. These options keep your maps up-to-date with the latest information when there’s a data connection, providing you and your team with greater situational awareness.

Refresh intervals automatically update your map layers at a specific time interval that you set. You can set your layers to update as often as every 6 seconds for most layer types!

For example, you may want your team to be aware of each other’s location so that you can properly respond during a live event. You can do this by setting refresh intervals on a layer in your web map that contains the last known location of each mobile worker from the Tracker for ArcGIS application.

Only authorized members of your team would be able to see each other’s locations. Your organization’s administrator would manage those permissions for your location tracking service. Learn more about tracking service privileges.

Explorer would display the last known locations of your team members and keep it updated (when there is connectivity) based on the refresh interval that you set up.

View tracks (iOS only)

Now mobile workers can view their own tracks from the Tracker for ArcGIS app in Explorer on their iPhone or iPad device.

This allows mobile workers to see a breadcrumb trail of where they’ve been. For example, a field worker may be inspecting damage in a disaster area which can be a highly disorienting situation. Viewing their tracks in Explorer along with the features in their map can help the field worker verify they covered the intended territory.

Manage complex workflows with easier app linking

Complex field operation workflows can leverage deep linking to create a streamlined mobile user experience.

You can link directly into Explorer through email, text, web page, QR code, and other applications. For example, from within a Workforce for ArcGIS assignment, a mobile worker can click on a link into the related map in Explorer to locate the asset of interest.

You can also link to other applications or websites from within Explorer. For example, once a mobile worker has found an asset in Explorer, you can use deep linking to take them directly into a form in Survey123 to collect information about that asset.

We’ve updated the format of our links to universal links to make it easier to manage deep linking workflows for any device. The new format also enables us to prompt the user to download the app if it’s not already on their device.

Sideload your basemaps

Basemaps are the largest component of most web maps and can make downloading offline areas more difficult in locations where there is limited or intermittent connectivity.

Explorer now supports the ability to use basemaps that have been copied directly onto the mobile worker’s device. You can do this by configuring your webmap to reference a basemap tile package that has already been deployed to the mobile device. This can greatly speed up download times for offline areas because the download only includes the operational layers. Learn more about using sideloaded basemaps.

For the mobile worker, sideloaded basemaps will display alongside connected basemaps in Explorer and will be available for them to use in any map they open.

Note: due to Android security changes, we’ve updated the location where your maps are stored on your device. If you are upgrading a device that has existing map packages on it, see our migration guide to get them moved to the right locations.

But Wait, There's More! With the latest release you can also:

  • Get directions: From Explorer, you can tap on a specific location or feature to open and get directions through Navigator for ArcGIS, Apple Maps, Google Maps, and Waze. (Android & iOS only)
  • Load mobile map packages through SD cards (Android only). Learn more.
  • Use raster and mosaic layers directly in your mobile map packages without creating tile packages.
  • Streamline your portal sign in process with our new portalURL link parameter so your mobile users don’t have to manually type in a URL to gain access. Learn more. (Android & iOS. Coming soon to Windows)
  • Display advanced symbology with Arcade (key for Military Symbology support). For more on this, check out the Arcade-based Styles section of this blog.
  • Maps now support group layers.

We also fixed a few bugs in the Windows release:

  • BUG-000127215 – Titles for related features display as ‘No Title’ when the relationship is to a table and map services are used in the web map.
  • BUG-000127242 – Features from map image layers that are selected in Explorer for ArcGIS do not appear as highlighted.

Get Started Today!

Are you ready to do some exploring? If you haven’t already, download Explorer for ArcGIS on your Android, iOS, or Windows 10 device.


New Britain Release (3.3)

by IsmaelChivite

New Britain is the largest island in the Bismark archipelago of Papua New Guinea. William Dampier, takes credit for being the first British man to land on this island. This happened on February 27, 1700. Since then we call this island New Britain ( Nova Britannia at the time). Both Wiliam Dampier and New Britain are fascinating. This island, of volcanic origin, was populated by two main indigenous groups: the Papuans who arrived tens of thousands of years ago, and the Austronesians, who joined the party around 2000 years ago. The island hosts remarkable traditional cultures. Still today, over 10 different Papuan languages are spoken in the island and as for the Austronesians languages, we count more than 40! William Dampier is known for being the first man to circumnavigate the world three times. He grew as a pirate attacking Spanish ships in America and then became a successful navigator and explorer. Dampier documented winds, tides and currents that were critical for future explorations by James Cook and Horation Nelson. His natural history observations were also highly influential on works of Alexander Von Humboldt and Charles Darwin.

With our 3.3 update, we celebrate the adventures of William Dampier and his landing over 300 years ago to the island today known as New Britain.

Enhanced support for GNSS receivers in the Survey123 field app

Starting with version 3.3, you can establish a direct connection between the Survey123 field app and your GNSS receiver. This is useful for several reasons:

  • More accurate location data : By leveraging dedicated high accuracy GNSS hardware, you can substantially improve the quality of the location data you capture with your smart forms . There is a wide range of GNSS receivers, some of them able to produce, if used properly, sub-meter and sub-centimeter accuracy.
  • Better understanding of the quality of the data : Having more accurate location data is not enough. It is also important to understand how accurate that data is. Most GNSS receivers are able to provide important information that describe how the locations you are getting were produced. This includes things like the type of fix (RTK Fixed, RTK Float, GPS, Differential GPS, SBAS. ), the differential age, reference station ID and many others. With version 3.3 of Survey123 and above, you can select which of these properties are important to you and store them as GIS attributes in the feature layer columns of your choice. For a complete list of all the location metadata you can extract from your location data with Survey123 refer to the extract geopoint values help topic.
  • Custom validation rules : You can use all the GNSS metadata described above to create custom data validation rules that get triggered while the data collection is happening . This is critical, as it can save many trips back to the field! It is important to note that you can use all the power of XLSForms to build sophisticated expressions that take advantage of this metadata.

In this initial release, we have thoroughly tested GNSS receivers built by a number of vendors including Leica, Eos Positioning Systems, Bad Elf, SXblue, and Trimble, although it technically can work with other receivers as long as they output NMEA sentences. Our choose a receiver help topic includes more information regarding currently supported hardware.

To support direct connections to external GNSS receivers, you will notice we have introduced several changes in the Survey123 field app. The Settings dialog in the app now includes options to connect to external location sensors via Bluetooth and network ports. For each connection you can also set user preferences such as a custom name for your device, the height of the antenna and handy visual and audio alerts to warn users in case the connection between the GNSS receiver and your device is interrupted.

Our XLSForm support has also been expanded so you can include in your form expressions to help work with the GNSS metadata in real time. This really opens a wealth of possibilities for you to use this information to design soft and hard data validation constraints in your forms. The geopoint help topic in our doc describes in more detail how to take advantage of this.

Point to Point Measurements with Spike® and the Survey123 field app

We introduced support for the Spike laser range-finder in March 2018. Spike is an excellent complement to Survey123, allowing you to quickly bring laser-accurate measurements into your forms. Jim Moore and Brett Stokes, who recently joined the Survey123 team, put together this video to demonstrate the basics of bringing measurements from Spike into Survey123.

In this release, we are bringing support for the Point to Point (P2P) measurement mode which was missing in our initial implementation. P2P is a very handy way to calculate distances between two objects because it does not require you to identify a 2D plane on which to measure. In P2P mode you can simply aim Spike at the first object, such as the side of a house, and take a photo. Then, aim at the second object, such as a tree or fence, and take a second photo. Spike will calculate the distance between those two objects and bring that value into your Survey123 form. You can also use Point to Point to measure the height of an object such as a tree, streetlight or building.

Date/Time question type in web designer

A new Date/Time question type has been added in web designer. This will help you capture both a date and a time in one single row, saving vertical space in your forms. Within web designer you can set a default value for this question, either selecting a static value, or the exact time when the form is open. You can also set validation rules to constrain inputs to a time window.

Better field and choice naming in web designer

If you never liked auto-generated field names such as field_0 , field_1 . in your Survey123 feature layers, you will want to pay attention to this one. Let me start with a bit of context first: When you publish a survey in web designer, we create on your behalf a feature layer field for every question in your form. These fields are used later to store responses to your survey. Up until this release, the name of these fields followed a simple field_0 , field_1 pattern. This was typically never an issue when using the Survey123 web site to inspect your data, but it was not ideal when exporting results into Excel, CSV, or when configuring web hooks.

Starting with this update, a more friendly name will be given to these fields based on the label of your questions. The following animation compares what an auto-generated feature layer schema looked like before, compared to what you will get now.

Field and choice names are now derived from your question and choice labels. Given that there are some constraints that apply to the names that can be given to fields in a feature layer, you will notice that your labels will not be used literally. For example, spaces will be replaced with underscores (_), very long labels will be shortened and special characters will be eliminated.

Using the Modify Schema dialog you can optionally fine tune the names of fields and choices to your liking, although remember that you will not be able to make adjustments in the schema once the fields have been added to the feature layer.

The option to Modify Schema in the Publish Survey Dialog has also been made more visible as a reminder of this important step before you publish your survey.

Delete and edit existing records for survey owners

As a survey owner, I am sure you always submit a couple of records to test out your survey designs, immediately checking values in the Data tab. You can now easily delete, and even edit values right from the Survey123 web site. You no longer need to use a separate tool to do that. All you need to do is to select the records in the table view, and then choose the Delete or Edit options in the right panel to make the changes you want.


Getting your app together with Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS

5 What is Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS? It s a framework to create new apps without coding Interactive what you see is what you get user experience Extensible using widgets. Runs on any device, within a web browser Fully integrated with the ArcGIS Platform Host your apps online or run them on your own server Extensible

6 Two Options to Work with Web AppBuilder 1. Within ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS Embedded in the web site Activate from the map viewer or My Contents 2. Developer Edition Separate download and installed locally Use your own webserver Support for custom widgets and themes

7 Why should I use it? Develop once, deploy everywhere Reduce cost of development and maintenance. No programming background required for common GIS needs. Fully integrated with the ArcGIS platform. A new way to share data: any user can share data using ad-hoc Web Apps

8 Session path What is Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS? Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS tour What s new? July 2015 Demos Community and resources Wrap-up

9 Workflow for creating a new Web AppBuilder app

10 Integrate your organization s utility services ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS Organization settings panel Locators Base maps Print services

11 Web Apps from Web AppBuilder Apps are hosted in ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS Become items in My Contents folder Option to download source code for the app from Item Details page Customize web app Host in your own web server ArcGIS Online Portal for ArcGIS Production Web Server Web App1 Web App2 Web App2

12 Session path What is Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS? Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS tour What s new? July 2015 Demos Community and resources Wrap-up

13 5 New Themes Custom look and feel Billboard Box Dart Jewelry Box Launchpad

14 5 New Widgets: More functionality Search widget Stream widget Summary widget Incident Analysis widget GeoLookup widget

15 Other improvements Option to have widgets already opened when the web app starts up Support for uploading data for use in a GP service which has upload capability in the Geoprocessing widget Configurable context menus in the Layer List widget Interactive +/- zoom control in the map display with Zoom Slider widget Better responsive support in the Foldable and Tab themes Configure the sorting rules for query results in the Query widget Support Image Service Vector Layer and Image Service Layer

16 Export Web Apps as New Templates Use Web AppBuilder to create new templates which can be used in the ArcGIS Online/Portal for ArcGIS map viewer Web Map

17 Session path What is Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS? Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS tour What s new? July 2015 Demos Community and resources Wrap-up

18 Demo 1 Field data editing: Updating Melbourne s addresses database

19 Mobile editing Map Service ArcGIS Server Feature service ArcGIS Online Decision makers Web AppBuilder Default Data admin QC Field data capture Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS Editor2 Editor1

20 Technology used (minimum configuration) Web Tier: Web AppBuilder - ArcGIS Online edition, Editor widget Business tier: ArcGIS for Server Standard on premises. Feature service Data tier: Workgroup Geodatabase - SQLServer Express 2012 Feature class with domains, subtypes, relationship classes, attachments and editor tracking enabled.

21 Demo 2 Calculating walking times to public transport stops in Melbourne

22 Technology used Web Tier: Web AppBuilder - ArcGIS Online edition, Search, Geoprocessing, Directions and Printing widget, Business tier: ArcGIS Server on premises. Geoprocessing service (Network analysis extension Drive time process configured to walking time/distance Data tier: Enterprise Geodatabase in SQLServer 2012 Feature classes: tram and train stations from Public Transport Victoria

23 The workflow ArcGIS Desktop 1. Create a geoprocessing tool in ArcGIS Desktop to calculate walking times to public transport stops 2. Share the model as Geoprocessing Service in ArcGIS Server.

24 The workflow ArcGIS Online 1. Create Web AppBuilder application in ArcGIS Online that uses the geoprocessing widget 2. Configure the geoprocessing widget to use the geoprocessing service published in my ArcGIS Server.

25 Session path What is Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS? Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS tour What s new? July 2015 Demos Community and resources Wrap-up

26 GeoNet Esri Community 2 places for Web AppBuilder user community Both are very active

27 Road Ahead Web AppBuilder Developer Edition v1.2 Aug 2015 Support for 3D web scenes Support saving app state Enable client-side workflows E.g., result from one widget can be input into another widget *Not final Content subject to change

28 Session path What is Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS? Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS tour What s new? July 2015 Demos Community and resources Wrap-up

29 WAB is the framework to create web apps in ArcGIS without coding Deploy in ArcGIS Online or on-premises Develop once, deploy everywhere It is fully integrated with the ArcGIS platform.

30 Technology: Data: ArcGIS for Server Web AppBuilder Online edition Public Transport Victoria, VicMap Lite Resources:

31 STAY CONNECTED Linked In: Esri Australia s Technical Blog: Esri Australia Training: Subscribe to our e-newsletters:

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1 WRF Hydro Routing Grid Pre-Processor Python Toolbox Documentationversion2.0 Prepared By: Kevin Sampson and Dave Gochis, NCAR/Research Applications Laboratory Last Updated: April 9, 2014 Purpose This document describes the function and use of a stand-alone pre-processing utility that is designed to assist users in the creation of WRF-Hydro routing grids ( data layers ) using an ArcGIS Geographic Information System (GIS) from esri. Overview The processing that will soon be available on the WRF Hydro website ( via web processing service (WPS) is available to users as an ArcGIS Python Toolbox. Python toolboxes were implemented in ArcGIS Desktop version 10.1 as a way to create custom geoprocessing tools directly from Python scripts. All ArcGIS 10.1 installations come with Python installed by default and will be able to view this Python toolbox. The only additional requirement is for the user to have the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst Extension activated: For More information on how to activate Spatial Analyst Extension please visit: / Spatial Analyst: Summary of Software Requirements: ArcGIS Desktop 10.1 Spatial Analyst Extension Few tools are infallible and this is true for the WRF-Hydro pre-processing tool. There may be instances when the output from the tool is not precisely what was intended for a given application. The most common issue that arises is related to how stations are mapped (or snapped ) to a channel network and, in turn, how watersheds get defined from those locations. Should you run into this issue, please refer to the section below entitled Manual specification of station points for guidance. Tool Purpose: The purpose of this tool is to create the data layers for terrestrial overland flow, subsurface flow and channel routing processes required by WRF Hydro. These output data layers and the input requirements are all described below.

2 Additional Utility Tools: A few additional Utility scripts have been created to facilitate working with geogrid files in ArcGIS and to aid in the preparation or review of output from the WRF-Hydro pre-processing tools. Those Utilities are contained in the Utilities toolset within the Python Toolbox. These Utility tools are described in the Miscellaneous Topics in the use of the WRF-Hydro Pre-processor section below. Sample Input and Output Data: Sample input data and output data are provided so that users can see both how to format input data for the WRF-Hydro pre-processing tool and so they can see what the output should look like. These sample data are contained within the Standalone_Test_Data zipfile and embedded directory in the distributed tarfile. Using the tool: To view and open the toolbox, unzip the package to a location on your disk. From ArcCatalog or the ArcCatalog tab within ArcMap, navigate to the location Standalone_Tool folder (See Fig. 1). The Python toolbox exists as a.pyt file, and will behave like a regular ArcGIS toolbox (.tbx). The GEOGRID_STANDALONE toolbox contains a Processing toolset, containing a single ProcessGeogridFile script tool. There is also a Utilities toolset, containing three script tools for performing additional functions. Users may feel free to customize the toolbox and add any scripts or additional functionality necessary for processing WRF Hydro spatial data. Figure 1. Catalog Tree view of the Python Toolbox in ArcCatalog. Executing the Tool: Open the ProcessGeogridFile script tool by double-clicking on it, or right-click and select Open. A tool dialog will open, with two required inputs, as well as optional inputs and several default parameter values supplied. Once all required and desired inputs are given, simply click OK to execute.

3 Description of Tool Parameters Input Geogrid File: This is the input WRF geogrid file in NetCDF (.nc) format. This file must contain dimensions west_east and south_north, as well as variable HGT_M, which is the domain used for terrain processing. Supported projections currently include MAP_PROJ = 1 (Lambert Conformal Conic) and MAP_PROJ = 3 (Mercator). Forecast Points (CSV) (optional): This optional parameter requires a Comma-separated Values (CSV.csv) format file of gage locations in latitude/longitude coordinates (WGS84). A CSV file is a comma-separated ASCII file containing a 1 row header with gage location information on subsequent rows. The CSV file must contain a longitude field named LON and a latitude field named LAT in order to run, and no header names are allowed to contain spaces. An example is given below: FID,LON,LAT,STATION,Name 15, , ,Fraser_at_Granby, ,-105.9, ,COLO_nr_GRANBY, , , ,Blue_R_blw_Grn_Mtn,


ArcGIS 9. Building Geodatabases Tutorial

2 Copyright ESRI All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. The information contained in this document is the exclusive property of ESRI. This work is protected under United States copyright law and other international copyright treaties and conventions. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, except as expressly permitted in writing by ESRI. All requests should be sent to Attention: Contracts Manager, ESRI, 380 New York Street, Redlands, CA , USA. The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. DATA CREDITS Creating Topology Tutorial Data: U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Hydrography Dataset CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bob Booth, Andy MacDonald U.S. GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED/LIMITED RIGHTS Any software, documentation, and/or data delivered hereunder is subject to the terms of the License Agreement. In no event shall the U.S. Government acquire greater than RESTRICTED/LIMITED RIGHTS. At a minimum, use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in FAR Alternates I, II, and III (JUN 1987) FAR (JUN 1987) and/or FAR / (Commercial Technical Data/Computer Software) and DFARS (NOV 1995) (Technical Data) and/or DFARS (Computer Software), as applicable. Contractor/Manufacturer is ESRI, 380 New York Street, Redlands, CA , USA. ESRI, ArcView, the ESRI globe logo, ArcGIS, ArcMap, ArcCatalog, ArcEditor, ArcInfo, the ArcGIS logo, Geography Network, ArcSDE, SDE, Spatial Database Engine, GIS by ESRI, and are trademarks, registered trademarks, or service marks of ESRI in the United States, the European Community, or certain other jurisdictions. Other companies and products mentioned herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective trademark owners.

3 Indiana GIS Conference Building Geodatabases Tutorial IN THIS TUTORIAL YOU WILL LEARN Exercise 1: Organizing your data in ArcCatalog Exercise 2: Importing data into your Geodatabase Exercise 3: Creating subtypes and attribute-domains Exercise 4: Creating relationships between objects Exercise 5: Building a geometric network Exercise 6: Creating annotation Exercise 7: Creating Layer Files and Cartographic Representations for Geodatabase data Exercise 8: Creating a topology Exercise 9: SDE and Geodatabase Replication Introduction to the Geodatabase It is easy to create a Geodatabase and add behavior to it, and it requires no programming when you use the data management tools in ArcCatalog the application for browsing, storing, organizing, and distributing data. When querying and editing the Geodatabase in ArcMap the application for editing, analyzing, and creating maps from your data you can easily take advantage of the data and behavior in your Geodatabase without any customization. This tutorial lets you explore the capabilities of the Geodatabase using an ArcEditor or ArcInfo licensed seat of ArcCatalog and ArcMap. This tutorial includes nine exercises. Each exercise takes between 10 and 20 minutes to complete. In the first eight exercises of this tutorial, you will use ArcCatalog to create a Geodatabase that models a water utility network. You will add behavior to the Geodatabase by creating subtypes, validation rules, relationships, and a geometric network. You can use ArcMap to take advantage of the behavior by editing some of the existing features in the Geodatabase and adding some additional features. The study area for the exercises is a portion of a hypothetical city. A Geodatabase that contains most of the data, a Shapefile representing water laterals, and a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet representing parcel owner data are provided with the software. You will import the Shapefile and spreadsheet into the Geodatabase, and then modify its properties to give it behavior. The datasets for the exercises were created by ESRI using a database schema similar to that of the city of Montgomery, Alabama. The data is fictitious and has nothing to do with the actual city of Montgomery. This information may be updated, corrected, or otherwise modified without notification. 1

4 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference Exercise 1: Organizing your data in ArcCatalog Before you begin the tutorial, you must find and organize the data that you will need. This can be done using ArcCatalog. Connecting to data In ArcCatalog, data is accessed through folder connections. When you look in a folder connection, you can quickly see the folders and data sources it contains. You will now begin organizing your data by creating a folder connection to it. 1. Start ArcCatalog by either double-clicking a shortcut installed on your desktop or using the Programs list in your Start menu. 2. Click the Connect To Folder button and navigate to the BuildingaGeodatabase folder on the local drive where you installed the tutorial data. The default installation path is C:arcgisArcTutorBuildingaGeodatabase. Click OK to establish a folder connection. Your new folder connection C:arcgisArcTutorBuildingaGeodatabase is now listed in the Catalog tree. You will now be able to access all the data needed for the tutorial through that connection. 2

5 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase Exploring your data Before you begin modifying the Geodatabase, explore the datasets provided for the tutorial. 1. Click the plus sign next to the C:arcgisArcTutorBuildingaGeodatabase folder connection to see the datasets contained in the folder. Click the Preview tab and Expand Owners.xlsx then expand the worksheet list and click on Owners$(If you cannot find the Owner.xlsx then choose the Owner.xls). Notice how the Preview type automatically changes to Table and displays the table s records. This table contains the owner information for the Parcels feature class in the Montgomery Geodatabase. In the next part of this exercise, you will import this table into the Geodatabase and create relationships between the parcels and their owners. 2. Click the laterals coverage to see its geometry. 3. Click the plus sign next to the Montgomery Geodatabase and double-click each feature dataset to see the feature classes and relationship classes it contains. Click each feature class to preview its geometry. You will perform most of the tasks for modifying the Montgomery Geodatabase schema with ArcCatalog. Later, you will use ArcMap to create annotation and edit the Geodatabase. Now that you have found and organized your data in ArcCatalog, you are ready to start the first task in the tutorial importing data into the Geodatabase. 3

6 Introduction to the Geodatabase Exercise 2: Importing data into your Geodatabase Before you can start adding behavior to your data, you must get it into a Geodatabase. You will import two datasets into the Montgomery Geodatabase laterals and owner.dat. The laterals coverage contains water laterals for the Montgomery water dataset, and the owner.dat INFO table contains owner information for the parcel features already in the Geodatabase. Importing the coverage 1. In ArcCatalog, right-click the Water feature dataset in the Montgomery Geodatabase, point to Import, and click Feature Class (multiple). Indiana GIS Conference is used to specify your input coverage, input feature class, and output feature class. Because you opened this tool by right clicking a feature dataset, the output Geodatabase, Montgomery, and feature dataset, Water, are already filled in for you. There are several ways to set the input and output datasets. You can also drag a dataset or datasets from the ArcCatalog tree or Contents tab and drop them on the text box. Alternatively, you can click the Browse button to open the ArcCatalog mini-browser and navigate to your dataset or type the full pathname to the dataset in the text box. 2. Click the Browse button, navigate to the laterals Shapefile, and click Add. 3. Click OK You will use the Import Feature Class tool to import the arcs in the laterals coverage into the Water feature dataset. This tool A message appears showing the progress of your data import operation. When the tool is finished, the message indicates 4

7 Indiana GIS Conference that all the features have been imported. The laterals Shapefile is now in the Water feature dataset. 7. Right-click Laterals and click Properties. Introduction to the Geodatabase 4. Click Close In the ArcCatalog tree, navigate to and click the laterals feature class. Press the F2 key, and type Laterals to rename the feature class. 6. Click the Preview tab to see the features. 5 The names of feature classes and tables in a Geodatabase are the same as the names of the physical tables in the relational database management system (RDBMS) in which they are stored. When you store data in an RDBMS, the names for tables and fields are often unclear, and you need a detailed data dictionary to keep track of what data each table stores and what each field in those tables represents. The Geodatabase lets you create aliases for fields, tables, and feature classes. An alias is an alternative name to refer to those items. Unlike true names, aliases can contain special characters, such as spaces, because they do not have to adhere to the database s limitations. When you use data with aliases in ArcMap, the alias name is automatically used for feature 7 5

8 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference classes, tables, and fields. However, in ArcCatalog these items are always represented by their true names. 10 You will now create aliases for your new feature class and its fields Click the General tab Type Water laterals for the alias for this feature class. 10. Click the Fields tab. Click the OBJECTID field and type Feature identifier for its alias. 11. Repeat step 10 for the following fields: 6

9 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase 12. Click OK. Field Shape DEPTH_BURI RECORDED_L FACILITY_I DATE_INSTA TYPECODE Alias Geometry field Depth buried Recorded length Facility identifier Installation date Subtype code 1 Now that you have imported the Laterals feature class into the Geodatabase and added some aliases, you are ready to import the owner.dat INFO table. Importing the Excel Spreadsheets The owner Excel spreadsheet contains owner information for the parcels in the Parcels feature class in the Montgomery Geodatabase. To be able to create relationships between the parcels and their owners, the owner information must be imported into the Montgomery Geodatabase. You will use the Table (single) import tool to import the owner Excel spreadsheet into the Montgomery Geodatabase. You will then create aliases for the table. 1. Right-click the Montgomery Geodatabase, point to Import, then click Table (single). 2. Expand Owners.xlsx and drag and drop the Owners worksheet from the Catalog tree to the Input Table box

10 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 3. Type Owners in the Output Table text box, then click OK. A message informs you of the progress of the operation. When it finishes, click Close. 4. In the ArcCatalog tree, click the Owners table in the Montgomery Geodatabase. Click the Preview tab to see its rows. Field OBJECTID OWNER_NAME OWNER_PERCENT DEED_DATE Alias Object identifier Owner name Percentage ownership Date of deed The data in the laterals coverage and owners.dat INFO table is now in the Montgomery Geodatabase. Now you can take advantage of the Geodatabase by applying behavior to your data. You will begin this task by creating subtypes and attribute domains. 5. Right-click the Owners table and click Properties to see the table s properties. 6. Type Parcel owners for the alias for this table. 7. Click the Fields tab and type the following field aliases: 8. Click OK. 8

11 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase Creating an attribute domain Exercise 3: Creating subtypes and attribute domains One of the advantages of storing your data in a Geodatabase is that you can define rules about how the data can be edited. You will define these rules by creating a new attribute domain for lateral diameters creating subtypes for the Laterals feature class and associating the new domain, existing domains, and default values with fields for each subtype. Attribute domains are rules that describe the legal values of a field type. Multiple feature classes and tables can share attribute domains stored in the database. However, not all the objects in a feature class or table need to share the same attribute domains. For example, in a water network, suppose that only hydrant water laterals can have a pressure between 40 and 100 psi, while service water laterals can have a pressure between 50 and 75 psi. You would use an attribute domain to enforce this restriction. To implement this kind of validation rule, you do not have to create separate feature classes for hydrant and service water laterals, but you would want to distinguish these types of water laterals from each other to establish a separate set of domains and default values. You can do this using subtypes. To learn more about subtypes and attribute domains, see the topics on subtypes and attribute domains in the ArcGIS Desktop Help. 9 You will use ArcCatalog to create a new coded value attribute domain. This new domain will describe a set of valid pipe diameters for your new Laterals feature class. 1. Right-click the Montgomery Geodatabase and click Properties. 2. Click the Domains tab Click the first empty field under Domain Name and type LatDiameter for the name of the new domain. In the Description field, type Valid diameters for water laterals for the domain s description. 1 3

12 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference You will now specify the properties of the domain. These properties include the type of field this domain can be associated with, the type of domain it is range or coded value, the split and merge policies, and the valid values for the domain. A range domain describes a valid range of numeric values, and a coded value domain describes a set of valid values. In this case, you will create a new coded value domain. Domains have split and merge policies. When a feature is split or merged, ArcGIS looks to these policies to determine the values of the resulting feature or features for a particular attribute. 4. Click the Field Type to view a dropdown list and click Float for the field type for this domain Click the Domain Type to view a dropdown list and click Coded Values for the domain type. 6. Click the Split policy to view a dropdown list and click Duplicate for the split policy for the domain. The Merge policy will default to Default Value. You will type the valid values, or codes, for the coded value domain, and for each code, you will provide a userfriendly description. As you will see later in the tutorial, ArcMap uses the user-friendly description, not the code, for values of fields that have coded value domains associated with them. 7. Click the first empty field under Code and type 13 for the code then click the Description field beside it and type 13" for the code s description. 8. Add the following coded values to the list: Code Description 10 10" 8 8" 6 6" 4 4" 3 3" /4" 2 2" /2" /4" 1 1" /4" -9 Unknown 9. Click OK to add the domain to the Geodatabase

13 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase Creating subtypes and associating default values and domains Now you will create subtypes for the Laterals feature class and associate default values and domains with the fields for each subtype. By creating subtypes, not all the water lateral features need to have the same domains, default values, and as you will see later in the tutorial, connectivity rules. 1. Right-click the Laterals feature class and click Properties Click the Subtypes tab. You will now specify the subtype field for the Laterals feature class. The subtype field contains the values that identify to which subtype a particular feature belongs Click the Subtype Field dropdown arrow and click TYPECODE. You will now add subtype codes and their descriptions. When you add a new subtype, you will assign default values and domains to some of its fields. 4. Click the Description field next to subtype code 0 and type Unknown for its description. 5. Click the Default Value field next to H_CONFID and type 0 for its default value. Do the same for DEPTH_BURI and RECORDED_L. For the WNM_TYPE and PWTYPE fields, type WUNKNOWN as the default values. 11

14 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 6. Click the Default Value field next to DIAMETER and type 8 for the default value. Click the Domain dropdown list and click LatDiameter to set it as this field s attribute domain for the Unknown subtype Repeat step 6 for the MATERIAL field, typing DI for the default value. Click Material in the Domain dropdown list. 8. Add the following subtypes and set the default values and domains the same as for the Unknown subtype, except for the WNM_TYPE and PWTYPE field default values. Code Description Fields Default Value 1 Hydrant laterals WNM_TYPE, PWTYPE default value = WHYDLIN 2 Fire laterals WNM_TYPE, PWTYPE default value = WFIRELI 3 Service laterals WNM_TYPE, PWTYPE default value = WSERVICE When adding new features to a feature class with subtypes in the ArcMap editing environment, if you do not specify a particular subtype, the new feature will be assigned the default subtype. Once you have added all the subtypes for this feature class, you can set the default subtype from those you entered. 12

15 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase 9 9. Click the Default Subtype dropdown arrow and click Service laterals to set it as the default subtype. 10. Click OK. 10 You have now added behavior to the Geodatabase by adding domains and creating subtypes. Now you will add some additional behavior to the Geodatabase by creating relationships. 13

16 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference Exercise 4: Creating relationships between objects 2 In Exercise 2, you imported an INFO table containing owner objects into the Montgomery Geodatabase. The Geodatabase already has a feature class called Parcels that contains parcel objects. You will now create a relationship class between the parcels and the owners so that when you use the data in ArcMap you can easily find out which owners own which parcels. 1. Right-click the Landbase feature dataset, point to New, then click Relationship Class. 3 4 The New Relationship Class wizard opens. The first panel of the wizard is used to specify the name, origin, and destination feature class or table for the new relationship class. 2. Type ParcelOwners as the name of this relationship class. 3. Click Owners for the origin table Double-click Landbase and click Parcels for the destination feature class. Click Next. The next panel is used to specify the type of relationship class you are creating. You are creating a simple relationship class since owners and parcels can exist in the database independently of each other. You can, therefore, accept the default type simple relationship class. 5. Click Next. You must now specify the path labels and the message notification direction. The forward path label describes the relationship as it is navigated from the origin class to the 14

17 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase destination class in this case, from Owners to Parcels. The backward path label describes the relationship when navigated in the other direction from Parcels to Owners. The message notification direction describes how messages are passed between related objects. Message notification is not required for this relationship class, so accept the default of None. 6. Type owns for the forward path label and type is owned by for the backward path label. Click Next. The next step is to specify the primary key in the origin table (Owners) and the embedded foreign key field in the destination feature class (Parcels). Owners and Parcels that have the same value in these fields will be related to each other. 9. Click the first dropdown arrow and click PROPERTY_ID for the origin table primary key You will now specify the cardinality of the relationship. The cardinality describes the possible number of objects in the destination feature class or table that can be related to an object in the origin feature class or table. 7. Click 1 M (one-to-many) to specify that one owner may own many parcels. Click Next. You must now specify whether your new relationship class will have attributes. In this example, the ParcelOwners relationship class does not require attributes, which is the default. 10. Click the second dropdown arrow and click PROPERTY_I for the embedded foreign key in the destination feature class. 11. Click Next. A summary page appears. Once you have reviewed the summary, click Finish Click Next.

18 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference You have now added a second kind of behavior to the Geodatabase relationships. Next, you will continue to add behavior to the Geodatabase by creating a geometric network and defining connectivity rules. 16

19 Indiana GIS Conference Exercise 5: Building a geometric network Feature classes stored in the same feature dataset can participate in a geometric network. Geometric networks model network systems such as water networks. You will build a geometric network from the feature classes in the Water feature dataset in the Montgomery Geodatabase. You will then create connectivity rules to define which features can connect to each other in the network. Introduction to the Geodatabase create an empty one. You want the default Build a geometric network from existing features. 3. Click Next. You must now select which feature classes in the feature dataset will participate in the geometric network and what the name of the network will be. 4. Click Select All. Creating the water network 1. Right-click the Water dataset, point to New, then click Geometric Network. 4 5 The Build Geometric Network Wizard opens. You can use this wizard to build a geometric network from existing feature classes or to create an empty geometric network. In this case, you will be building a network from the existing feature classes in the Water feature dataset Type WaterNet for the name of the geometric network. Click Next. The option to exclude features with certain attributes makes it easier to manage the state of parts of the network if you need to drop the network and rebuild it after you have been working with it for a while. 6. Click No, so that all features will participate in the geometric network. Click Next. 2. Click Next. The second panel is used to specify whether to build a network from existing feature classes or to 17

20 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 9. Click Next. You will now specify which line feature classes will become complex edge feature classes in the geometric network. Complex edge features are not split into two features by the connection of another feature along their length thus, they are useful for modeling water mains, which may have multiple laterals connected to them. By default, all line feature classes become simple edge feature classes. 7. Click Yes to specify that some of the line feature classes will become complex edges. 6 Features in a geometric network must be precisely connected to one another. The input feature classes can be adjusted to ensure connectivity by snapping. You will specify whether these features need to be adjusted to snap to one another in the network-building process. 10. Click Yes to specify that some of the features need to be adjusted. Type 1.0 for the snapping tolerance. 11. Click Select All to indicate that the features stored in each feature class can be adjusted. Click Next Check Distribmains and Transmains to make the water distribution and transmission mains complex edges

21 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase You must specify which, if any, of the junction feature classes can act as sources and sinks in the network. Sources and sinks are used to determine the flow direction in the network Click yes to indicate that some of the junction feature classes will act as sources or sinks. Geodatabase. Next, you will establish connectivity rules for your water network. Creating connectivity rules Network connectivity rules constrain the type of network features that may be connected to one another and the number of features of any particular type that can be connected to features of another type. By establishing these rules, you can maintain the integrity of the network connectivity in the database. 1. Right-click WaterNet and click Properties. The Geometric Network Properties dialog box opens. The dialog box provides information about feature classes participating in the network and a list of the network weights. You can also add, delete, and modify connectivity rules using this dialog box. 13. Check the Tanks feature class to indicate that tanks can be sources or sinks in the network. Click Next. Now you can assign network weights. A network weight describes the cost of traversing an element in the logical network, such as the drop in pressure as water flows through a pipe. This geometric network does not require weights, which is the default. 14. Click Next. A summary page appears. Once you have reviewed the summary, click Finish. A progress indicator appears, displaying the progress for each stage of the network-building process. Your new geometric network, WaterNet, has been created in the Montgomery 19 1

22 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 2. Click the Connectivity tab This tab lets you add and modify connectivity rules for the geometric network. You will first create a new edge junction rule, which states that hydrants can connect to hydrant laterals it also indicates that when a hydrant lateral is created, a hydrant junction feature should be placed at its free end. 3. Click the dropdown arrow and click Laterals. 4. In the list of subtypes in the feature class, click Hydrant laterals. You will now click the types of junctions that hydrant laterals can connect to in the network. For simplicity, hydrant laterals can only connect to hydrants. 5. Check Hydrants in the list of subtypes in the network. You should also specify that when you create a hydrant lateral, if an end of the lateral is not connected to another edge or junction, then a hydrant is placed at that end. 6. Click the plus sign to expand Hydrants, right-click Hydrants under it, then click Set as Default. A blue D will appear next to the hydrant subtype, indicating that it is the default junction for this edge subtype. You will now create a new edge edge rule that states that hydrant laterals can connect to distribution mains through taps, tees, and saddles. The default junction for connections between hydrant laterals and distribution mains will be taps. 20

23 Indiana GIS Conference 7. In the network subtypes list, click the plus sign to expand Distribmains and check Distribmains under it Click OK. Introduction to the Geodatabase You have now added behavior to your Geodatabase by defining connectivity rules. You would normally define many more connectivity rules for a network. However, for this tutorial, you only need to define the connectivity rules specified here. In the next part of the tutorial, you will create feature-linked annotation for your new hydrant lateral feature class. 8 Because you have checked an edge in the network subtypes list, the list of junction subtypes in the network becomes active. In this list, you can specify which junction types hydrant laterals and distribution mains can connect through. 8. In the Junction subtypes list, click the plus sign to expand Fittings and check Tap, Tee, and Saddle in that order. Notice that Tap has a blue D next to it this means that Tap is the default junction. Check WaterNet_Junctions, which is the generic, or default, network junction type. 21

24 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference Exercise 6: Creating annotation In Exercise 1, you browsed through the existing feature classes in the Montgomery Geodatabase. One of these feature classes contained annotation that was linked to features in the Distribmains feature classes. You then imported the water laterals from a Shapefile into the Water feature dataset. Now you will create labels for the water laterals in ArcMap and convert them to an annotation feature class that is linked to the laterals. Creating labels for the lateral subtypes You will start ArcMap and add the Laterals feature class. 1. Click the Launch ArcMap button. Start a new, empty map document Click the Laterals feature class, drag it from ArcCatalog, and drop it on the ArcMap table of contents. Because you created subtypes for the Laterals feature class, each subtype is automatically drawn with unique symbols. You will create different label classes for the subtypes. 3. In ArcMap, right-click Laterals and click Properties. 3 22

25 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase 4. Click the Labels tab Check the box to Label features in this layer Click the Method dropdown list, click Define classes of features, and label each class differently. 7. Click Get Symbol Classes. Now the layer has several label classes defined one for each subtype and one for other values. Defining the labels for the hydrant laterals The different subtypes of laterals have different roles in the water system. For example, service laterals bring water from the distribution mains to residences or businesses, and hydrant laterals bring water from mains to fire hydrants. You will make the labels for the hydrant laterals red to make it easy for mapreaders to differentiate hydrant laterals from other laterals. 1. Click the Class dropdown list and click Hydrant laterals. 2. Click the text color dropdown arrow and click a red swatch from the palette. 3. Click the Bold and Italic buttons. 4. Click Expression. Sometimes you want to label features with the content of a single field. The Label Field dropdown list lets you select a single field with which to label features. At other times, you may want to create labels that are more complex. The Label Expression dialog box lets you construct labels by concatenating one or more fields and other text. You can also add logic to the label expression using a scripting language. To create the labels for the hydrant laterals, you will load a label expression that has been saved to a file. 2 23

26 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 5. Click Load. This VBScript expression evaluates the length of each lateral if its value is greater than 200, it labels the lateral with the contents of the DIAMETER field, a space, and the contents of the MATERIAL field. If the length is less than 200, it labels the lateral with the contents of the DIAMETER field. The label expression has been saved to a file called lateral_exp.lxp in the Layers folder for the BuildingaGeodatabase tutorial folder. 5 You will adjust this expression for the Hydrant laterals so that Hydrant laterals longer than 100 feet get the more complete labels. 7. Click in the Expression box and change the value in the If statement from 200 to 100. Click Verify. 6. Navigate to the Layers folder, click lateral_exp.lxp, and click Open. 24

27 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase The expression is tested and a sample is displayed. 8. Click OK on the Label Expression Verification dialog box and click OK on the Label Expression dialog box. You have created an expression for the Hydrant laterals label class. Next, you will create expressions for the label classes of the other subtypes Use the same procedure that you just used to define the labels for the Hydrant laterals, but make these labels black, and do not modify the label expression after you load it. Defining the labels for other laterals Defining the labels for the service laterals The service laterals tend to be shorter than the hydrant laterals. For this exercise, it is only important to show their material type when they are longer than 200 feet, so you will load the label expression again and use it without modifying it. You have loaded label expressions for the Hydrant laterals and Service laterals. Now you will define the labels for Fire laterals, Unknown laterals, and the <all other values> class. Because these classes are less common and only the diameter is of interest, you will use the Diameter field alone to label these features. 1. Click the Class dropdown list and click Service laterals. Now you can set up the label parameters for this label class. 25

28 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 1. Click the Class dropdown list and click Fire laterals. 2. Click the Label Field dropdown list and click DIAMETER. 1 2 Unlike labels, annotation is static. Annotation features are stored. They have a fixed location and a reference scale, so when you zoom in, the text gets larger on the screen. You can make labels behave more like annotation by setting a reference scale. This should be the scale at which the map will most commonly be used. When you convert the labels to annotation, you want the annotation to have the right reference scale so it will be drawn at the right size, relative to the features, on the maps you create. 1. Click the Zoom In tool and click and drag a box around some of the laterals on the eastern edge of the data. 3. Use the same procedure to set the labels for the Unknown and <all other values> label classes. 4. Click OK on the Layer Properties dialog box. The labels are drawn on the map. The Hydrant laterals are labeled in red, and because of the label expression, the longer ones are also labeled with their material type. You have created labels for the different subtypes of laterals, using the symbology classes in ArcMap to derive the label classes. Now you will convert the labels to annotation in the Geodatabase. 1 Setting the reference scale for the labels Labels are dynamic they are regenerated when you pan and zoom around the map. By default, they will be drawn using the same size symbol, regardless of the scale to which you zoom. Not all features can be labeled using an 8-point font at the full extent of the feature class, but if you zoom in, there will be more space around the features, so more labels will be drawn. Labels are now drawn for more of the laterals. 26

29 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase Converting the labels to annotation 2. Type 1000 in the Scale box and press Enter. Now that the reference scale is set, you can convert the labels to annotation and store them in your Geodatabase. You will convert the label classes into subtypes of a single featurelinked annotation feature class. This process requires an ArcEditor or ArcInfo licensed seat of ArcMap. With an ArcView seat, you can create annotation from labels but not featurelinked annotation. 1. Right-click Layers and click Convert Labels to Annotation. Even more of the labels are now drawn. This is the scale at which the data will usually be drawn, so you will now set the reference scale for the map and the annotation that you create from it Right-click Layers, point to Reference Scale, and click Set Reference Scale. Now, when you zoom in or out, the labels will get larger or smaller Click in the Annotation Feature Class column for the Laterals feature layer and rename the output annotation feature class LateralsAnno. 27

30 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 2 3 This will reduce the storage space needed in the Geodatabase for the annotation. Each annotation feature will reference a symbology table in the Geodatabase, rather than storing all its own symbology information. You will not be able to store graphics in this annotation feature class. The check boxes for the two feature-linked annotation editing behavior options are checked by default. New annotation will be created when new laterals are added, and existing annotation will move when laterals are moved or reshaped. 5. Click OK. 3. Click the Properties button. 4. Check the box to require symbol to be selected from the symbol table Click Convert. A message box will appear showing the progress of the conversion process. After a short time, it will finish. The labels 5 are converted to a set of annotation classes within a single annotation feature class. A relationship class is also created that links the annotation to the laterals. 28

31 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase 7. Close ArcMap. You have created an annotation feature class in the Geodatabase. The annotation classes within it correspond to the subclasses of the laterals feature class. Some of these annotation classes have special symbology, as well as logic to annotate certain features with extra information. When the Laterals feature class is edited in ArcMap, the corresponding annotation features will be created or modified using the symbology and annotation expression you created. 29

32 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference Exercise 7: Creating layers and Cartographic Representations for your Geodatabase data To make browsing for and symbolizing data more convenient, you can create layers from your Geodatabase data and use these layers in ArcMap. Most of the layers you will need have been created for you they are stored in the Layers folder in your tutorial directory. In this exercise, you will create new layers for the Laterals and the LateralsAnno feature classes. Creating the Laterals layer 1. In ArcCatalog, right-click the Laterals feature class and click Create Layer. 3. Click Save. The new layer is created. You will modify the properties of the layer to add symbology. 4. Open the Layers folder in the ArcCatalog tree, right click the Water Laterals layer, and then click Properties Browse to the Layers folder under your tutorial directory and type Water Laterals for the name of the new layer. You can use the Layer Properties dialog box to modify many aspects of a layer, such as its visible scale and transparency. In this case, you will modify its symbology. 30

33 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase Click the Symbology tab. By default, the unique values classification based on the subtype field is used to symbolize the layer. This is the setting you want, but you must modify the symbology of each subtype. 6. Double-click the colored line next to Hydrant laterals. The Symbol Selector dialog box appears. You will use this dialog box to set the symbol properties for the laterals. 7. Click the Color dropdown arrow and click a purple patch on the color palette to make the line purple. 8. Type 1.5 in the width text box to give the line a width of Click OK. 10. Repeat steps 6 through 9 for the Fire laterals, making the symbol a red line with a width of Repeat steps 6 through 9 for the Service laterals, making the symbol a dark blue line with a width of Click OK to close the Properties dialog box. Your Water Laterals layer is complete. You can now create the annotation layer for the water laterals. 31

34 Introduction to the Geodatabase Creating the Lateral Diameter layer 1. Right-click the LateralsAnno feature class and click Create Layer. Indiana GIS Conference For large annotation feature classes and in multiuser environments, the former approach is best, as it is the most effective way to prevent large numbers of annotation features from being needlessly requested from the server. 1 For this exercise, assume that users of this feature class will usually add the layer you have created, rather than adding the annotation feature class directly. 1. In ArcCatalog, right-click Water lateral diameter annotation.lyr and click Properties. 2. Click the General tab Navigate to the Layers folder and type Water lateral diameter annotation for the name of the new layer. 3. Click Save. The new annotation layer is created. Since this layer points to an annotation feature class, the symbology is a property of the annotation, so it does not have to be set in the layer. 3 Setting a visible scale range for the layer Annotation features are most useful within a narrow range of map scales in which they are legible. It is often helpful to set a minimum and maximum scale within which annotation feature classes will be drawn. You can make this visible scale range a property of the annotation feature class itself or set it as a property of a layer that points to the annotation feature class. 3. Click the do not show layer when zoomed button, type 2500 in the Out beyond box, and click OK. To set the scale range for an annotation feature class, right click the annotation feature class in ArcCatalog, click Properties, and click the Annotation Classes tab. You can set a separate scale range for each annotation class in the 32

35 Indiana GIS Conference annotation feature class. Click the Scale Range button to set the minimum and maximum visible scales. Cartographic Representations So far, you have learned how to create layer file that stores symbology and properties about your data in a static file. One of the advantages of the Geodatabase is that you also have the ability to store symbology directly inside the Geodatabase using Cartographic Representations. Feature class representations let you store symbology with your features in the Geodatabase and edit the appearance of individual features on your maps. Tools to help you manage representations include a new layer symbology option to display layers with a representation, an interface for configuring individual symbols within a representation, and a set of editing tools to modify the appearance of features symbolized with representations. Representations let you control the appearance of features in a way that previously required exporting your map to a dedicated graphics program. You can now store alternate feature geometry that is used only for symbology, not for processing or analysis. Representation information is stored in Geodatabase files. Only Geodatabase feature classes can store representations. A single feature class can have multiple representations to support a variety of maps from a single data source. To get started we need to create a new feature class. 1. Open ArcMap by going to Start > All Programs > ArcGIS > ArcMap and browse for an existing map. Navigate to 2 Introduction to the Geodatabase C:ArcGISArcTutorBuildingaGeodatabseMapsM ontgomery.mxd and choose open. The map looks like any ordinary map with a few layers turned on and quite a few turned off. 2. From the menu choose bookmarks and select the Detail bookmark. Once you are zoomed in, you will notice that several layers have turned on including the Water system we created earlier. 3. From the table of contents select the Parcels layer, right click and choose properties. 4. Choose the symbology tab and notice how an additional option from the show box titled Representations. This indicates that a cartographic representation was created for this layer and is currently being used to symbolize the data on the map. 33

36 Introduction to the Geodatabase 4 You will notice at the far right of the table that there are two fields called RuleID and Override. Indiana GIS Conference 5. Click Cancel and Right Click on the Parcels Layer and choose Open Attribute Table. 5 The RuleID field is an integer field that stores a reference to the representation rules. Representation rule information is stored within system tables of the Geodatabase. Since it is an integer field (with a coded value domain), you can manually edit the values in the field to assign a different representation rule to a feature. You can also use the Representation Properties dialog box during an ArcMap editing session to do this. The Override field is a binary large object (BLOB) field that stores feature-specific overrides to the representation rules. Overrides are changes to the representation properties at the feature level and may include changes to feature representation geometry depending on how the, editing behavior of the representation is set. 6. Open ArcToolbox by clicking on the Toolbox icon on the standard toolbar 6 7. In ArcToolbox expand Data Management Tools and then expand Feature Class. You will find a tool titled Create Feature Class 34

37 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase 7 8. We are going to import building footprints from a CAD file so we need to create the new feature class in the LandBase Feature Dataset and call the new feature class Buildings You will notice that I did have you specify a coordinate system. Because this new feature class is inside a feature dataset, it inherits the coordinate system information from the dataset. The Building layer is automatically added to the map but has no data. We are going to add data now Click on the Add Data button and browse to the BuildingaGeodatabase directory and search for the GreenAcres.dwg file. Double click on the file to reveal the sub layer menu and choose polygon and click add

38 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference Start an edit session by going to View > Toolbars Editor. On the Editor Dropdown choose start editing and set the building as the target layer. 12. Choose Copy and then Paste and the buildings will copy from the CAD file to the Geodatabase Feature Class. This only works if the features you are copying are of the same geometry type as the destination feature class Right Click on GreenAcres.dwg Polygon and choose Selection > Select All 36

39 Indiana GIS Conference 13. Now that the buildings have been added, go to the editor dropdown menu. 14. Save Edits and then Stop Editing. 15. Right click on the buildings layer and choose properties then click on the symbology tab. Set the symbology similar to the graphic below. Introduction to the Geodatabase 16. Click OK to close the Symbol Selector and the click OK again to close the Building Properties. 17. Right Click on the Buildings Layer and choose Convert Symbology to Representation 17 37

40 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference 18. Uncheck Add new layer to map symbolized with this representation and choose Convert Click Add new Fill Layer to add an additional polygon fill to the representation. 19. Right click on the buildings layer, choose Properties, and then choose the Symbology Tab. In the Show: Menu choose Representations and you will see the newly created Buildings_Rep 20 38

41 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase 21. Drop the new fill below our first fill by clicking twice on the down arrow From the list of Geometric Effects Choose Move from the list 22. Change the color of the fill to be a dark brown and click on the Add Geometric Effect Tool to add the Move Effect. 24. On the Move tool set the X offset to -2 pt and the Y offset to -3pt and click OK 39

42 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference organization my need to provide to its customers like Full Color Maps, Black and White Engineering Maps, Web Applications and Mobile applications. You have successfully imported Shapefile, Excel and AutoCAD DWG data into your Geodatabase. You created subtypes, rules, a geometric network, and feature-linked annotation and Cartographic Representations. Now you will create a topology. 25. The results give the building depth and they appear as if they are 2 ½ D. It was mentioned earlier that multiple representations could be created for a feature class. This would quickly allow users to assemble maps based on different products that an 40

43 Indiana GIS Conference Exercise 8: Creating a topology In Exercise 5, you created a geometric network. A geometric network is a specialized type of topological relationship that allows network tracing, analysis, and editing. In this exercise, you will create a Geodatabase topology. A Geodatabase topology allows you to specify rules that control the spatial relationships of features in a dataset. There is a variety of topology rules that you can apply to your data, depending on your organization s requirements. You will only apply two topology rules to this dataset. Creating a topology You will create the topology to regulate two types of spatial relationships in this dataset. The first is that parcels should not overlap, and the second is that parcels that have been classified as residential must fall within blocks that are also classified as residential. 1. Navigate to the Landbase dataset in ArcCatalog. Introduction to the Geodatabase This dataset contains several feature classes. You will create a topology using two feature classes Parcels and Blocks. 2. Right-click Landbase, point to New, and then click Topology. The New Topology wizard starts. The first page provides a brief description of the wizard. 3. Click Next. The wizard presents a default name and cluster tolerance for the topology. You will accept the default name that the wizard provides. The default cluster tolerance is based on the XY Tolerance of the Landbase dataset. 4. Type 0.01 to set the new cluster tolerance, and then click Next Check Blocks and Parcels. 2 These feature classes will participate in the topology. 41

44 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference One of the topology rules that you will create will concern the Parcels feature class, and the other will be between one subtype of Parcels and one subtype of Blocks, so both Blocks and Parcels feature classes must participate in the topology. If one of these feature classes were already participating in another topology or a geometric network or if they were registered as versioned in a multiuser Geodatabase, it would not appear in the list of feature classes available to add to this topology. 5 within the cluster tolerance would snap together, with the less accurate ones moving to the location of the more accurate ones. The GPS features would not be moved to the position of the 1:1,000,000-scale features. You can assign up to 50 different ranks, with 1 being the highest rank. In this topology, you will assume that all the feature classes are based on equally accurate data, so you will not assign more than one rank. Parcels and Blocks have equivalent levels of accuracy, since the Blocks feature class was derived from the parcel features. 7. Type 1 for the number of ranks Click Next. The next page of the wizard allows you to set the number of topology ranks and the rank of each feature class in the topology. Ranks allow you to ensure that more accurately collected features are not snapped to the position of less accurately collected ones when the topology is validated. For example, if you were including a feature class that was collected using a survey grade global positioning system (GPS) unit and a feature class digitized from a 1:1,000,000- scale source map in the same topology, you might assign the GPS feature class a rank of 1 and the 1:1,000,000-scale source feature class a rank of 5. If you were to validate the topology, parts of features that fell 8. Click Next. 9. Click Add Rule. 9 42

45 Indiana GIS Conference Introduction to the Geodatabase Topology rules allow you to define the permissible spatial relationships of features within and between feature classes that participate in the topology. Landownership parcels are usually not allowed to overlap each other. You will add a rule to prevent your parcel features from overlapping each other Click the feature class dropdown arrow and click Parcels Click the feature class dropdown arrow, click the plus sign to expand Parcels, and click Residential. 11. Click the Rule dropdown arrow and click Must Not Overlap Click OK. You have created a rule governing the topological relationship of features within the same feature class. Next, you will create a topology rule governing the topological relationship of features in particular subtypes of two different feature classes. Specifically, you will make sure that residential parcels are covered by or contained within blocks also designated as residential. Residential is a subtype of the Parcels feature class that the planning department uses to represent parcels where people live. 15. Click the Rule dropdown arrow and click Must Be Covered By Click Add Rule.

46 Introduction to the Geodatabase Indiana GIS Conference Click the Feature class dropdown arrow, click the plus sign to expand Blocks, and click Residential. 17. Click OK. The topology rule is added to the list of rules for this topology. 18. Click Next. After the topology is created, you have the opportunity to validate it. You do not need to validate the topology immediately after creating it. Depending on your data and your workflow, it may make sense to assign different areas to data editors to validate and edit within ArcMap. 20. Click Yes. The topology appears in the Landbase dataset. 19. Click Finish. 44

47 Indiana GIS Conference Exercise 9: SDE & Geodatabase Replication ArcGIS Desktop (ArcEditor and ArcInfo), ArcGIS Engine, and ArcGIS Server Workgroup come with an executable file that installs SQL Server Express and enables the SQL Server Express instance to store ArcSDE Geodatabases. These Geodatabases use the ArcSDE direct connect libraries installed with the ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Engine, or ArcIMS client to connect from the client application to the SQL Server Express database. You must have administrative privileges on the computer on which you want to install SQL Server Express. Users with administrative privileges on the machine automatically have administrator privileges in the database server except when SQL Server Express is installed on a machine with a Windows Vista operating system. During installation, a database server administrator can be added to the instance. To administer an ArcSDE database server, you add a database server connection in the Catalog tree. This is a connection to a SQL Server Express instance set up to store Geodatabases. Adding a database server creates a database server connection file and an icon in the Database Servers folder for that connection. Once you are connected to a database server, you are able to administer the database server itself as well as add, remove, or administer the Geodatabases on the database server. How to add a database server 1. In the Catalog tree, expand the Database Servers folder. 2. Double-click Add Database Server. 3. In the Add Database Server dialog box, provide the name of the ArcSDE database server. This will be in the form Introduction to the Geodatabase <server_name><instance_name>, where the server name is the name of the server on which SQL Server Express is installed and the instance name is the name of the SQL Server Express instance. For this exercise the database server is named LocalhostSQLEXPRESS, Localhost is the server name and SQLEXPRESS is the instance. Normally you would use the computer hostname however in a lab setting the hostname Localhost is more appropriate. Why Localhost? In computer networking, Localhost (meaning "this computer") is the standard hostname given to the address of the loopback network interface. The name is also a reserved domain name set aside to avoid confusion with the narrower definition as a hostname. Localhost is specified where one would otherwise use the hostname of a computer. For example, directing a web browser installed on a webserver to will display the home page of the web site being served from the computer running the browser, but only if the web server is configured to service the loopback interface. 4. Click OK. 3 45

48 Introduction to the Geodatabase 5. The server icon will appear under Database Servers in the Catalog tree. Add users and groups to a database server 1. Right-click the database server to which you want to add a user or group. 2. Click Permissions. Indiana GIS Conference 4. Specify the location where you want to search for the user or group. For this exercise, we will use the username that we use to login. 5. Type the name of the user or group you want to add. You can click the advanced button to do a more specific query to find the desired user. 6. Click Check Names to verify 7. Click OK Click Add user on the Permissions dialog box. 8. The newly added user or group is automatically highlighted on the Permissions dialog box, so if you want to make this user a database server administrator, simply click Server administrator on the database server Permissions dialog box. Creating new Geodatabases 1. In the ArcCatalog tree, right-click the ArcSDE database server on which you want to create a new Geodatabase. 2. Click New Geodatabase Type the name Montgomery for the new Geodatabase in the Geodatabase name text box. 46

49 Indiana GIS Conference *Geodatabase names must begin with a letter, cannot contain spaces or special characters (such as or *), and has a maximum length of 31 characters when combined with your server name. 4. If you want to change the database file location, specify the new location in the Geodatabase file text box by clicking the ellipsis button (. ) and browsing to the location. In the case of a partitioned hard drive or second hard drive where you have a C and D drive, a best practice is to store data on the D drive away from the OS and program files. This can add a slight performance boost to the I/O of your data. 5. Type the size of the new Geodatabase in the Initial Size text box to be 1 and choose MB from the Units drop-down menu You can choose to set the initial size to be MB or GB and can accept the default size of 100 MB. (Regardless of the initial size, the Geodatabase will grow, as it needs to, up to 4 GB.) However, the initial size of the Geodatabase cannot be smaller than that of the model database in the SQL Server Express instance. The model database is the system template for all new databases. The size of the model database determines the minimum size of any database created in that SQL Server Express instance. If you attempt to create a Geodatabase smaller than this minimum size, database creation will fail and the following error message will be returned: Introduction to the Geodatabase A progress bar will display while the database file and Geodatabase schema are created. When complete, the new Geodatabase will appear on the Contents tab and in the ArcCatalog tree. NOTE: You cannot create a new Geodatabase on a database server (nor delete an existing Geodatabase) if you are connecting with an ArcView license. Tip: It can take some execution time to create a new Geodatabase, especially if the initial file size is large. Load Data into SDE Now we are ready to load the SDE Geodatabase with data. There is a perception that this is a daunting and cumbersome task but the reality is that it is as simple as copy and paste. Because our data is loaded in a File Geodatabase, loading the database is complete. The Geodatabase is highly scalable and much like ArcView, ArcEditor and ArcInfo as you upgrade your Geodatabase you unlock functionality. Once data is loaded into any Geodatabase that data can be copied to any type of Geodatabase, as Geodatabases do not discriminate against one another. 1. In ArcCatalog go to C:ArcGISArcTutorBuildingaGeodatabase choose the contents tab and select Landbase and Water and right click choose copy. Error creating this Geodatabase: CREATE DATABASE failed. Primary file must be at least <size of model> to accommodate a copy of the model database. 19. Click OK. 47


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